"I suggest that this, my reader, is one of the things you are striving to master as part of your basic foundation ... if you 'want it all.' "

Among the few books worthy of an aspiring artist's attention is Boston School painter, Philip Hale's "Vermeer of Delft," a volume he continued to upgrade for many years after its first publication in 1913. The final version was published posthumously by his Boston School trained wife, Lillian Wescott Hale, a remarkable artist in her own right whose charcoals are really breathtaking. William Paxton, Gammell's teacher of note, consulted with Hale on the book. Notable in the essay for gaining an understanding of the Boston School, is the differentiation Hale makes in the management of color between Vermeer and his contemporary, Rubens. Rubens, he says, "noticed that indoor lights were apt to be cooler than the shadows [which] were apt to be rather warm. Rubens reduced this to a formula...." Continuing he writes that "Vermeer, on the other hand, had the pretension to make each tone just as it appeared" and that "[i]t is this preoccupation with color values which makes modern painting wholly different from antique painting." I suggest that this, my reader, is one of the things you are striving to master as part of your basic foundation ... if you "want it all." Being the modern that you are.

Woman with a Pearl Necklace, Johannes Vermeer, 1664

Peter Paul Rubens, The Consignment of the Regency c.1622-24

Woman Sewing, William MacGregor Paxton, 1919